Recovering Nihilist
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It happens often.

At the moment, it makes perfect sense. I have a point to make. It sounds justified. Rational. I nod with certainty when I re-read the words I have poured out with utmost sincerity. It sounds like the truth.

Of course it is,” I reassure myself.

I hit publish.

The words have left my fingers and are now imprinted on the screen, but the thoughts still linger on in my mind. Over time, the surety starts to wane. I encounter new viewpoints, stronger opinions, better explanations. On good days I realise that my arguments lack depth. On bad days I doubt if my writing is just immature, whimsical winning. …


We all know who I am talking about.

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Marcus Aurelius

It’s difficult to believe that we’d have anything in common with a dead Roman Emperor but Marcus Aurelius’ Meditations quickly dispels that myth. While the world has changed massively, human nature hasn’t. We are still faced with many of those problems that homo sapiens have been tackling since the dawn of society. Morning lethargy, noisy environment and the failings of character — none of that is new.

As humans, we will face demanding situations. There’s no denying that. But the counsel of wisdom in those moments can completely change the course of our lives. …


“I opened myself to the gentle indifference of the world, finding it so much like myself.”

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Albert Camus

Albert Camus’ The Stranger begins with one of the most legendary opening lines in literature —

“Maman died today. Or maybe yesterday; I can’t be sure.”

In a few words, Camus manages to sum up Meursault’s character and to some extent, the idea of absurdism. Meursault is the anti-hero. He receives the news of his mother’s passing with indifference. Instead of viewing the body one last time, he smokes and sips on his cup of coffee, right in front of the coffin.

The only thing that seems to trouble him is the sun and its blistering heat. …


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I’ll cut the chase — I love podcasts. They make the best companions during hours spent doing minimal mental-effort work.

Though admittedly, it was a true-crime podcast which first got me hooked (yes, Serial), since then I have ventured to discover some amazing podcasts which aren’t all about blood and gore. The ones listed below deal with a range of topics, providing an abundant dose of food for thought. Listening to them often feels like eavesdropping on an intelligent conversation and leaves me with a new perspective, one I hadn’t considered before.

So here’s a list of five podcasts you should definitely check out in no particular order. …


The Irish woman who rose from the dead.

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Few can claim to come back from the dead but according to an Irish Legend, Margorie McCall did just that.

At some point in the 1700s, a “terrible famine” swept across Lurgan, a town in Northern Ireland. During these troubling times, a woman called Margorie McCall suffered a high fever before the doctors pronounced her dead. Worried that whatever mysterious disease that plagued her could quickly spread, she was hastily buried in the Shankill Graveyard.

Just after her burial, graverobbers paid her a visit. When they found a valuable ring on her finger, they struggled to pull it out. Failing to do so, they decided to cut her finger off. As the knife sliced through her flesh, Margorie stirred back to life, shocking the life out of the grave robbers. Some say they fled the scene never to be seen again. …


This one really works

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Productivity could easily be one of the most searched words on the web. There are countless articles and videos geared at helping you increase your efficiency and productivity. However, with the bounty of apps and tools, it’s quite easy to lose track of exactly why you want to be so productive in the first place.

Sometimes, productivity can seem like a cult. We worship self-help gurus, waiting for them to share their dose of wisdom so that we could get more done. …


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In 1904, Tsarina Alexandra gave birth to the Russian heir, Alexei Nikolaevich. As the youngest child and only son, his birth was the cause of great joy and celebration. But fate didn’t tarry in taking a cruel turn. Soon enough, he was diagnosed with haemophilia — a bleeding disorder which stops the blood from clotting properly. It was dubbed as the “Royal Disease” because it affected many of the descendants of intermarried European families. Alexei is said to have inherited it from his mother who in turn inherited it from her grandmother, Queen Victoria.

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Alexei Nikolaevich

His haemophilia was so severe that a minor cut could turn to be fatal. Sometimes he couldn't walk due to the pain in his joints and had to be carried around by sailors. The disorder hampered his childhood and education and proved to be the cause of immense worry for his parents. …


At least not always.

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I read a book a few years ago that proudly stated “Happiness is the goal of life! Everyone wants to be happy!” Though I forget the book’s title, I do remember being highly sceptical of this claim.

Happiness is thought to be this place of absolute joy, where nothing ever goes wrong. An idyllic state. Much of our strife is justified with this nine-letter word. It’s an easy answer to the dreadful why.

Why should I do this? — Because it will make you happy!

Why should I buy this new product? …


“When Love beckons to you, follow him, Though his ways are hard and steep.”

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Al Mustafa peered into the deep seas, awaiting the ship that would carry him back home after twelve long years. As he prepared to bid adieu to Orphalese, the town that sheltered him through the duration of his exile, he is stopped by the people of the town. They have seen his wise gaze befall the soil of Orphalese and they know that he carries profound wisdom. They plead with him, to delay his departure so that he can talk to them about life. …


A Book Review

Why won’t she speak?

“Her silence was like a mirror — reflecting yourself back at you. And it was often an ugly sight.”

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https://www.bookshelvesandpaperbacks.com/contact/

I had The Silent Patient on my reading list for quite some time now. I have always considered myself more of an “I need to feel the touch of the pages” kind of a person, but then with everyone having to self-isolate and Amazon struggling to deliver even basic items, ordering a physical copy was out of the question. I might have just put reading the book off for another couple of months had it not been for the rave reviews this book has received. …

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